Marilyn Diptych By Andy Warhol

This printing is about the varying faces of Marilyn Diptych and the color variation helps in expressing different moods.

Subordination

The balance is not symmetrical with the black and white side subordinating the colored side. The black and white side is also varying in tone with the lighter side subordinating the darker side in the picture. This subordinating is what creates the emphasis.

Emphasis

Emphasis is created in the picture by the variation in tune, or hue, the artists has created interest in the picture by creating dominance in the art composition. For example, the focal point is the colored pictures or side because of the intensity of the color, people would easily focus on the colored side than on the black and white side. Additionally, she has used texture with the dark value on the black and white side to create another focal point. Shape is also used to create dominance on the black and white side especially with the half heads.

Balance (Symmetry And Asymmetry)

While the picture can be divided into two equal parts with equal elements, the picture is not proportional (asymmetrical) in terms of elements. For example, one side is colored, the other side is black and white, and then the black and wide side is graying and fading tone. This patterns tends to create emphasis and subordination

Extra Credit Question (10 Points)

Screen-printing is significant because it makes it easy to use non-representational color in addition to the representational form as the most effective way of conveying emotion. It is the versatility of the screen-printing that makes it more significant as compared to other techniques such as etching, or even the more common lithography. Additionally, screen-printing can be done on a number of media to realize different goals. Andy Warhol in his Marilyn Prints to convey emotion and symbolically to convey different moods used the screen-printing. He did this by varying or adjusting the colors to create varying sensations

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