Haitian Hip-Hop

Haitian hip-hop may have developed from over the years from the traditional mannerism to the Americanized version. However, there are still a lot about the Haitian hip-hop that differentiates it from the world hip-hop. This paper posits that the Haitian hip-hop may have been affected by the American hip-hop fashion, mannerism, and style, but the language remains the same.

Haitian hip-hop culture

In Haiti, the hip hop is called Rap Kreyòl, and is mostly characterized by chants and raps with strong beats and Rap Kreyòl ix connected part of a culture just like rap culture is a major culture in many of the Caribbean music are majorly rap and reggae though their genre differs. To the Haitians, Rap Kreyòl is culture that defines them and it is the Rap Kreyòl they use to communicate their socioeconomic and political messages (McGill 3). The Haitian hip-hop is currently adopting the American hip-hop culture due to it importation of the materialism and consumerism mostly common in American hip-hop video. However, the Haitians have maintained that the Rap Creyol is a culture and is quite different from the other hip-hops such as the American hip-hop because it focuses on the social political issues in Haiti. For example the songs of Rockfam, and Brimad (Kitwana 36).

Rap Kreyòl is more of American hip-hop but with the Haitian traditional music, Haitian Creole language, and mannerism despite the American beats. In essence, it s quite clear that in as much as the rap Creole may be considered as Haitian fusion, it borrows a lot from the American hip. According to Wildermuth, rap Kreyòl is authentic Haiti music, but this is not the case as can be heard from the song Wale Kitem by Master Dji because the song is predominantly Kreyòl language with American beats and mannerism (Par. 7). While this can be a secluded case, Haitian rap Kreyòl is unmistakenably similar to American hip-hop and the only difference that cane seen is the use of the Creole language, which many Haitians are slowly fading out for English (McGill 3).

Since the Haitians are moiré used to the violence, tribulations and ghetto life, they tend to identify with the American rap culture and the media has exposed the Haitians to the American hip-hop culture. This may have been the reason why most of the Haitian rap Kreyòl artists are increasingly portraying the materialism and consumerism mannerism of the American hip-hop in a poverty-ridden Haiti (Manuel, Bilby, &, Largey pp. 161- 189)

Conclusion

The rap Kreyòl may have not lasted longer as other genres of rap music, but it had a greater impact in the lives of the Haitians as it introduced the American hip-hop to Haiti, however, in the recent past, the importation of the whole music weakening the rap Kreyòl. It is clear that with time, the cultural conquest will completely elimination rap Kreyòl as Americanization is faster taking over Haiti music scene

Annotated Bibliography

Wildermuth, Erin. "American hip-hop in Haiti: Musical fusion or cultural conquest?" 21 Apr. 2011. 27 Mar. 2014 <http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/apr/21/us-hip-hop- Haiti-musical-fusion-cultural-conquest/>.

Wildermuth introduced the hip-hop culture and looks at the impact of American mannerism, fashion and hip hop culture on the Haitian traditional music. However, he posits that the American hoop hop music in Haiti is more of a cultural conquest and not musical fusion. The articles provider a very sound argument in favor of the thesis statement.

Peter Manuel, Kenneth Bilby, Michael Largey, Caribbean Currents: Caribbean Music from Rumba to Reggae. Temple University Press. Pp. 161- 189. 2012. Print

The shift in the musical current has brought changes in the Caribbean much and most of the original traditional rumba music is increasingly being fused with foreign and modern music. This book analyses Caribbean music, development and changes. The book is ideal for this research as it introduce the Caribbean music, and the key players in the Haiti musical fusion and the impact of the American hip-hop on the traditional music in Haiti. It analyze the growth of Kreyòl and the impact of Americanization on rumba

Master Dji – Wale Kitem. Dir. Master Dji. Perf. Master Dji. You tube. 23 Sept. 2008. 27 Mar. 2014 <http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DwrnIWxcEb90%26feature% 3Dplayer_detailpage>.

This is a video of one of the originators of the Haiti Kreyòl Masterdji. It demonstrates the humble beginnings of the Kreyòl music.

Kitwana, Bakari. The hip-hop generation: Young Blacks and the crisis in African American culture. New York: Basic Civitas Books, 2002. Print

This book analyses the hip-hop generations and focuses on the Caribbean music. The Haiti youth are said to be undergoing a cultural metamorphism as they take up cultures from different parts of the world. It also introduce the cultural crisis that most Haiti youth are facing especially American materialism, and rap

McGill, Lisa D. Constructing Black selves: Caribbean American narratives and the second generation. New York: New York UP, 2005
McGill argues that the black selves has increasingly been constructed by the hip-hop culture and looks at the factors that have contributed to this development. However, I find this article biased and non-objective in some areas. Overall, her argument on the Haiti hip-hop is valid as it presents the same argument by a number of authors- hip-hop cultural conquests in Haiti

Works cited

Wildermuth, Erin. "American hip-hop in Haiti: Musical fusion or cultural conquest?" 21 Apr. 2011. 27 Mar. 2014 .

Peter Manuel, Kenneth Bilby, Michael Largey, Caribbean Currents: Caribbean Music from Rumba to Reggae. Temple University Press. Pp. 161- 189. 2012. Print

Master Dji – Wale Kitem. Dir. Master Dji. Perf. Master Dji. You tube. 23 Sept. 2008. 27 Mar. 2014 .

Kitwana, Bakari. The hip hop generation: Young Blacks and the crisis in African American culture. New York: Basic Civitas Books, 2002. Print

McGill, Lisa D. Constructing Black selves: Caribbean American narratives and the second generation. New York: New York UP, 2005

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